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Letter From New York Times Founder Henry Raymond - 1866

$ 2,475.00

In 1851 a journalist and later politician who once worked for Horace Greeley on the New York Tribune ( and had a tumultuous relationship with him ) decided it was time to start his own newspaper, and so the New York Times was formed in September of that year. Named the Daily Times, the paper became officially the New York Times in 1857.

It was a contentious period in American politics--the Whig party vs the newly formed Republican party (today's GOP),with Raymond himself essential in its formation. There were wars in Europe involving France, Austria and what would later become Northern Italy, and of course the beginnings of the Civil War here in America as journalists exploited both sides of the slavery and secession issues. Raymond would soon be elected to such positions as Speaker of the New York Assembly, Lieutenant Governor of New York and a House of Representative member. He was also a close advisor to President Lincoln and responsible for writing and creating Lincoln's campaign platform of 1864. Indeed, he was very well placed in American politics .

Born in 1820 in Lima, New York, he was educated at the University of Vermont and later the Columbia Law School. He served as the Times publisher and editor in chief until his death in 1869, age of just 49, and was buried in Brooklyn at Green-Wood Cemetery.

This letter, dated Washington, March 3rd,1866 in response to an autograph request, is fully written in his hand and reads, "I am sure no one need grudge the little time required to comply with your request. I certainly do so with very great pleasure ". Handwritten letters responding to autograph requests are very popular in the collecting world and this one is in wonderful, unscathed condition, free of rips, tears or other imperfections.It's as fine an exemplar as one will find.

As one can imagine, Raymond's autograph is scarce, and needless to say extremely significant in the world of business, journalism and of course Nineteenth Century politics. He was an advisor to President Lincoln during the tumultuous period of the Civil War and was instrumental in the formation of today's Republican Party. We doubt that we will ever see another such example, especially a fully handwritten letter, and were quite fortunate to be offered this fine collectible.This one appeals to a wide variety of interests and will be a welcome addition to any advanced collection.

We placed this this letter in a piece of archival Mylar and had it professionally double matted and framed,along with a photograph (appropriately) from the New York Times archival file. Overall dimensions are 17x24 inches.


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