Charles Lindbergh Signed 1929 Miami-Panama Canal Air Mail. PSA Image 1
Charles Lindbergh Signed 1929 Miami-Panama Canal Air Mail. PSA Image 2
Charles Lindbergh Signed 1929 Miami-Panama Canal Air Mail. PSA Image 3
Charles Lindbergh Signed 1929 Miami-Panama Canal Air Mail. PSA Image 4
Brigandi Coins & Collectibles

Charles Lindbergh Signed 1929 Miami-Panama Canal Air Mail. PSA

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Charles Lindbergh Signed 1929 Miami-Panama Canal Zone Inaugural Flight Cover

A 1929 southbound Foreign Airmail Route 5 Flight Cover signed by American aviator Charles A. Lindbergh (1902-1974) as "C.A. Lindbergh" above the printed "Department of Commerce" return address. The envelope, once carried aboard Lindbergh's Sikorsky amphibian airplane, bears sixteen cancelled 2 and 5 cent U.S. stamps (for a total postage of 77 cents). With five additional handstamps, including two large square cartouches emblazoned "First Flight / Air Mail International, F.A.M. 5 / Miami - Canal Zone." Postmarked from Miami, Florida on February 4, 1929, and hand stamped at Cristobal, Panama two days later. With a typed mailing address to "Mr. James D. Summers" in Panama City, Panama. Letter-opened verso. Expected wear, else near fine. 8.875" x 3.875".

Charles A. Lindbergh, a rather nondescript Midwestern air mail carrier, rocketed to celebrity after his record-breaking solo non-stop transatlantic flight from New York to Paris in 1927. Lindbergh helped found what would later become TWA in 1929, and legitimized the nascent American airline industry by developing rules and regs and charting many of the air routes still used today.

On February 4, 1929, Lindbergh embarked on the inaugural flight between Miami, Florida and the Panama Canal Zone by way of Havana, Cuba; Belize, British Honduras; Tela, Honduras; Managua, Nicaragua; Puenta Arenas, Costa Rica; David, Panama; and Colon, Panama. The 3-day-long journey covered 2,100 miles. Lindbergh successfully delivered 350 lbs of air mail, including this envelope, on February 6th. His route, known as Foreign Airmail Route 5, would later constitute the western leg of the so-called "Lindbergh Circle."