1901 $10 Bison & 1899 $5 Oncpapa Silver Certificate, Paper Currency Display
1901 $10 Bison & 1899 $5 Oncpapa Silver Certificate, Paper Currency Display
1901 $10 Bison & 1899 $5 Oncpapa Silver Certificate, Paper Currency Display
1901 $10 Bison & 1899 $5 Oncpapa Silver Certificate, Paper Currency Display
1901 $10 Bison & 1899 $5 Oncpapa Silver Certificate, Paper Currency Display
Brigandi Coins & Collectibles

1901 $10 Bison & 1899 $5 Oncpapa Silver Certificate, Paper Currency Display

Regular price $ 2,500.00 $ 0.00 Unit price per


Money of the Wild West Framed Display
1901 $10 Bison (Lewis & Clark)
1899 $5 Indian Chief

A gorgeous Americana display featuring two of the most beautiful notes in United States History! Notes produced before 1929 are referred to as “horse-blankets” for their huge size. They measure 7.5” x 3.5”, which is 25% larger than today’s standard paper currency. These large rarities feature incredible vignettes and artwork to celebrate Western Expansion. We have also opened the back of the frame to view both the obverse and reverse!

1901 $10 Bison Note (Lewis and Clark)
This 1901 $10 bill symbolizes America’s frontier spirit! It features the North American Bison centered between vignettes of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, the famous explorers of Westward Expansion from the Louisiana territory to the Pacific Northwest.

This "sawbuck" is one of the most popular notes in United States history. In fact, it was so popular that the image was re-used on the 30-cent postage stamp in 1923 and again on a $1 Military Payment Certificate issued to troops during the Vietnam War. It also happens to be one of the toughest legal tender notes, as experts estimate that only 3,000 to 4,000 pieces exist in any condition!

1899 $5 Silver Certificate Oncpapa Indian Chief
The powerful engraving of Running Antelope, Chief of Lakota Sioux, makes this the first and only note to feature a Native American as the central motif. This Silver Certificate is the most popular $5 Bill ever produced by the United States.

The note caused some ill will among the tribes of the Great Plains when it was issued. The artists accidentally depicted Running Antelope in a Pawnee headdress because his Lakota headdress was too tall for the engraving. The engravers at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing did not know that the Lakota and Pawnee were mortal enemies on the Great Plains, and this led to more tension between the two tribes!